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Legacies

the omaha symphony • legacy of sounds

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ©LAURIE AND CHARLES AND COURTESY OF THE OMAHA SYMPHONY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ©LAURIE AND CHARLES AND COURTESY OF THE OMAHA SYMPHONY

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in 1921 warren g. harding had just entered the white house, a hershey bar cost a nickel and babe ruth swatted a then record 59 home runs. in february of that same year, the first us transcontinental air-mail flight flew from san francisco to new york city. in march, the omaha symphony was born.

 

 


 

LIKE MOST ARTS ORGANIZATIONS IN THE 1920s and 1930s, the symphony weathered suspensions of service during the Great Depression and later during World War II when its flutists liberated France and its cellists did the same for the Czechs, but the group founded by Henry Cox had by then also won a battle of a different kind; outlasting the several other Omaha ensembles of the era whose memory is now relegated to the dusty shelves of history.
 

Steady growth driven by the sort of community support that gives our town its singular “Omahaness” has fueled a rich tradition highlighted by memorable evenings with such masters as Itzhak Perlman and Yo-Yo Ma.
 

“The arts and especially the Omaha Symphony with its rich 90-year history of success plays such an important role in the metro area,” said John P. Nelson, a longtime symphony supporter, board member and Chairman/CEO of Silverstone Group. “It was especially fitting that we honored Dick and Mary Holland,” at last month’s Omaha Symphony 90th Anniversary Gala, “whose vision and generous support has created such a wonderful home to showcase the symphony and the arts in our community.”
 

The buzz at last month’s gala, as it should be with any creative company, was as much about the future as it was about the past. Indeed, history resonates with each vibrato from strings that have the spectral quality of seeming to echo long after being bowed, but no one at the symphony is waiting around for those echoes to subside.  
 

 

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