Overcast   60.0F  |  Forecast »
Bookmark and Share Email this page Email Print this page Print Feed Feed

metroWELLNESS: Doing it by the Numbers

THE OMAHA METRO DIVISION OF THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION

(page 7 of 7)

 

SEVEN SIMPLE STEPS TO A HEALTHIER HEART
Getting and maintaining a healthy heart is vital to living a long and active life. Many people mistakenly believe that heart health is a goal they can’t obtain, but all it takes are a few simple changes to your everyday habits to be on the road to feeling better and living longer.
 

GET ACTIVE. Just 30 minutes of physical activity everyday is enough to keep your heart, body and mind healthy. Play with your kids, walk the dog or so some quick laps around the office at lunch – find a way to work 20 minutes of movement into your day.

CONTROL CHOLESTEROL. Know your numbers and get your cholesterol checked. A cholesterol level of 200 mg/dL or higher puts you in a high-risk category and is cause to take action.
 

EAT BETTER. Aim for getting in more vegetables and fruits. They are high in vitamins, minerals and fiber and low in calories & may help you control your weight and your blood pressure.
 

MANAGE BLOOD PRESSURE. By keeping your blood pressure in the healthy range (less than 120 mm Hg systolic AND less than 80 mm Hg diastolic), you reduce your risk of your heart having to pump harder.
 

LOSE WEIGHT. 145 million Americans are overweight or obese & at higher risk for such health problems as high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol and diabetes.
 

REDUCE BLOOD SUGAR. The American Heart Association considers diabetes and high blood sugar one of the six major controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. In fact, adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to have heart disease or a stroke than adults without diabetes.
 

STOP SMOKING. Smoking is the most important preventable cause of premature death in the United States. Smokers have a higher risk of developing many chronic disorders, including numerous issues that can be either indirectly or directly linked to atherosclerosis – the buildup of fatty substances in the arteries – which can lead to coronary heart disease, heart attack (myocardial infarction) and stroke. Controlling or reversing atherosclerosis is an important part of preventing future heart attack or stroke.

 

VISIT MYLIFECHECK.ORG TO SEE HOW YOU’RE DOING RIGHT NOW IN TERMS OF A HEALTHY HEART & GET TIPS ON KEEPING THAT TICKER GOING STRONG FOR YEARS TO COME.

 

 

 

Add your comment: