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Over the Edge

DEFYING GRAVITY WITH THE MID-AMERICA COUNCIL

Touch it. Experience it. Own it.

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“EVERYTHING JUST
LOOKS SO SMALL!”

 

These were the comments made by Jack Brown after his descent from “over the edge.” That sort of “people look like ants from up here” musing is not uncommon coming from somebody perched atop a 478-foot building, but Brown wasn’t talking about the dizzying view. And he wasn’t talking about what he saw when he glanced down in rappelling the Woodmen Tower during Over the Edge, the Boy Scouts of America Mid- America Council fundraiser that delivered a gravity-defying experience to Brown and 49 others.
 

He was referring to cone dystrophy, the inherited ocular disorder that has already begun to take its toll on the Millard North freshman’s eyesight.
 


“It’s not that my vision is blurred ordimmed or anything like that,” headded. “It’s hard to explain tosomeone with normal vision but, tome, everything just looks, well, small.”
 

“SHE’S A GUTSY ANDFEARLESS GIRL. DOINGWHAT SHE’S JUST DONE WOULD FRIGHTEN THE HECK OUT OF ME. AND THAT’S FROM A GUY WHO FLIES HIS OWN PLANE.”

~BOB HOIG
 

Brown’s “small” but big-hearted storyas told in a social media essay contestled metroMAGAZINEto select himto be our guest in practicing hisSpiderman skills. The magazine co-sponsored the event that nettedalmost $41,000 for the Mid-AmericaCouncil.
 

“Besides being a great fundraiser,” saidScout Executive / President EricMagendantz, “Over the Edge allowsus to showcase some of the thrill andexcitement that we have to offer.Scouting teaches kids to be adultsbefore they have to be adults.
 

”When thinking about outdoorclassroom experiences, s’mores-smeared adventures at the council’sCamp Cedars or Camp Eagle mayleap to mind. Over the Edge is areminder that urban areas, even thesheer face of the city’s second tallestbuilding, have a majesty all their own.
 

metroMAGAZINEpublisher Andrea“Andy” Hoig was joined by KMTV’sErika Summers, KFAB’s LucyChapman, WOWT’s John Nicely andChuck Amoura of AmouraProductions in testing the ropes as the first to lower themselves from the Woodmen Tower.
 


 

Nicely taped a mid-air promo for hisnewscast but Chapman topped thatby landing 14 minutes after RexSport had put an engagement ring onher finger in a cleverly devisedrooftop ruse.
 

“I propose to a woman and she goesand throws herself off a building,”Sport later quipped.
 

It has been suggested to me that it would be unwise to print that at leastone participant made the descent withtheir eyes closed for much of the drop.Or that it’s a good thing that screamscannot be heard 30 floors below theprecipice of the building whosefamiliar “Woodmen” letters measurethe same height as a school bus.
 

“I’m glad I’m on the ground,” Hoigsaid with a smile as she was beingdisconnected from a jumble of ropes,harnesses, gizmos and doodads. “It was an exhilarating experience andI’d do it again in an instant, but whatis more important is that we had thechance to support scouting and thatwe provided Jack with what we hopeis an experience of a lifetime.”
 

Jack Brown doesn’t know how muchor how fast his vision will deteriorate.In the meantime he continues to aimhigh– 478 feet high in this case.
 

“I saw everything in a different wayfrom up there,” he beamed. “I couldsee forever.”

-end- metroMAGAZINE

 

 

 

 

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