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New Calves on Display

 

 

 

 

 

 

Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo welcomes a few new additions, two Addax calves, one Bongo calf and two Dama gazelle calves. The one male addax calf was born June 28, 2011 and one female was born July 2, 2011. The bongo calf was born on August 18, 2011 and the sex is currently unknown. The one male Dama gazelle calf was born on August 13, 2011 and the other male was born on August 29, 2011.

 

Bongos are native to forest regions in Kenya, Africa. Their diet consists of trees, brush, vines, bark and grasses. They are the largest of the African forest antelope and are listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List for Endangered Species due to habitat loss and hunting. This birth is the eleventh born in the last 12 months in the United States according to the International Species Information System (ISIS) and was a recommended breeding by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Species Survival Plan (SSP). Omaha’s Zoo has two males and two females in addition to the new calf.
 

Native to the Sahara desert in Africa, Dama gazelles are considered the largest species of gazelles. They have longer legs and necks compared to other species. Their diet consists of grasses, leaves, shoots, fruit and especially Acacia leaves. Dama gazelles have been known to reach running speeds of 62 miles per hour. They are listed as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List for Endangered Species due to poaching and habitat destruction. It is believed the current wild population is less than 500. The births were recommended breeding’s by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Species Survival Plan (SSP). Omaha’s Zoo has one male and three females.
 

Addax are extinct in the wild except for a few small groups in Niger and Chad due to over hunting and loss of agriculture. They were found mostly in north central Africa in the central Saharan desert, near sand dunes, clay gravel plains and rocky plateaus. Addax diets consist of desert grasses, acacia foliage and leguminous herbs. They can live for long periods of time without water due to the moisture in the vegetation they eat. Addax have unique hooves, similar to a snow shoe, allowing them to move across the sand. These births were recommended breeding’s by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Species Survival Plan (SSP). Omaha’s Zoo has seven males ten females.

 

 

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